Tag: health


Wellbeing in workspace design – the sitting question

Wellbeing in workspace design – the sitting question

Back in June we wrote a piece about standing more at work in this blog and it seems the interest in the influence of workspace design on wellbeing is only growing.  We recently attending a Chartered Institute of Ergonomics & Human Factors event on the topic which featured a talk from Tim Hunter on what works in getting people to stand up and move around more...

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Helping Dell Communicate Good Ergonomics for CAD Users

Helping Dell Communicate Good Ergonomics for CAD Users

We’ve just finished working with Dell on a brief guide to workstation design, health and wellbeing for CAD users.  The brief was to help users of Dell CAD workstation equipment to improve the set-up their workstations through the use of good ergonomics. It needed us to stop and think about what kind of things make CAD users different from normal computer users. This covered things...

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Office workers “forget to stand”

Office workers “forget to stand”

Reported by the BBC, a study recently presented at the British Psychological Society’s annual conference suggests that people are spending longer sat at their desks and forget to stand, walk around and get the benefits of some posture change.  Workers are now spending on average nearly 6 hours a day at their desk! Some suggest reminders to get up are a way to solve this...

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Is sitting up straight really ergonomic?

This recent article on the BBC website suggested that sitting up straight to work wasn’t actually as good for your back as previously suggested. …an interesting report suggesting the low-strain result of slouching, we’re sure that the results are right, but what about the conclusions in the article?  The report could easily be misinterpreted The posture may be OK for relaxing (isn’t this what this...

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Health & Safety gone mad? What can ergonomics do?

There are always articles appearing in the press about “barmy” decisions taken on the basis of “health & safety”, usually by local authorities. The theme is usually an over-reaction to what, for most of us, would seem a fairly non-hazardous activity in an attempt to remove any trace of liability. Two articles in the press this week highlight this again: firstly, this article appeared in...

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