Tag: design



People Shaped Innovation

A good friend of CCD, Matt Marsh from Firsthand Experience, gave this talk to a TEDx event recently and we wanted to share it. Its an interesting discussion about innovation and the early insight of human-centered approaches.  Matt’s point about understanding people’s needs and wants as an early part of the design process is really interesting.  He highlights a number of failures that might have...

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The British Road Sign

The British Road Sign

Is there a better example of human-centered design than the road sign?  The Design Museum has recently added the UK road sign design to its collection recognising it as a classic. The standardisation and consistency of design means that we all understand them They are remarkably effective at transmitting the necessary information in the often short time that a driver had before they pass it. The brilliance, when the...

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Bicycle indicators – useful or not?

Bicycle indicators – useful or not?

A while ago we came across this innovative product for an integrated bike light, mirror and indicator.  It’s an interesting idea to remove the need for the cyclist to remove their hands from the handle bars The interesting question seemed to be one of conditioning for the car drivers.  Drivers are used to looking for hand signals (even if they aren’t very good at seeing...

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What does “ergonomics” mean for designing work spaces & buildings?

At CCD, most of our work is the application of ergonomics/human factors to the design of the built environment; in particular to control centres. But the use of the term “ergonomics” often brings confusion and misunderstanding about what we actually do and the value that it brings to projects. This seems to be largely due to the strengthening association of the term ergonomics with office...

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Impact of Poor Design on Patients

We came across this interesting article on the link between design in hospitals and the impact on the patients and their recovery. The British Medical Association is calling on healthcare organisations to prioritise design in all future building projects. A new report presents research showing that the architectural environment can significantly affect patients’ recovery times. In contrast, poorly designed hospitals and surgeries can cause anxiety,...

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Reflections on Norman Foster’s RIBA Annual Discourse

Reflections on Norman Foster’s RIBA Annual Discourse

During this stimulating and thought provoking talk, Lord Foster raised some very interesting points which, sat in the audience as a Human Factors professional, got me thinking…. A number of residental buildings were built in India (not by Foster) to re-house occupants of a slum. However, years later they still sat empty because dispite being more modern and providing sanitation, they did not provide the...

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Deralict buildings and the role of design in community identity

Deralict buildings and the role of design in community identity

Hastings Pier has recently burnt down by arsonists. Its loss raises a question of cultural identity and building function. The pier has been out of use since 1996 and become increasingly derelict. Is Hastings still Hastings if it doesn’t have a pier? What about civic pride/sense of identity? Is a derelict building like graffiti – shows no-one cares, break down of society…attracts more crime. The...

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Making air travel even more unpleasant?

Making air travel even more unpleasant?

Over recent years, air travel has become a less and less enjoyable passenger experience.  Notably the increase in security at airports has meant queues and hassle; budget airlines have given us low cost but the pay off is a scramble to get a seat, paying for loads of extras, etc. Now it seems that the industry is making moves to make it even less comfortable...

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How human factors can improve train interiors

How human factors can improve train interiors

As the railway industry becomes more focused on the passenger, the role of human factors in producing good design that delivers what the passenger wants is becoming more important. In this article in the International Railway Journal this month, our very own Mike Stearn highlights the areas in which improvements can be made.  This starts with understanding the different kinds of passengers travelling on the...

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User centered design in times of austerity

As the economic reality tightens its grip on both the public and private sector, what part can user centered design play? Firstly, within projects is it a “nice to have” or a necessity? Our experience is that it is an investment and the pay-off is in minimising the risk of later re-design when it’s found that it can’t be used by the user. Get it...

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