Tag: Design thinking


What is intuitive design…part 2

What is intuitive design…part 2

In part 1 of this blog on intuitive design we discussed how perceptions and experience vary so much between individuals.  The role of human factors in the design process is critical in trying to understand this variability.  This is especially true in the design of products like medical devices. In this second part, we explore some of the details around psychology and behaviour and how...

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What is intuitive design?

What is intuitive design?

If a user describes a product or system as intuitive it is among the highest praise they can offer. Given this, it’s reasonable to ask what it means to be intuitive. It seems nobody really knows. Ironically, people’s definition of intuitive is, well, intuitive, as they struggle to define the term in a specific, meaningful way. A dictionary definition: Intuitive is when users understand behaviour...

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“People vs Graphic Design” – our take on the Clerkenwell Design Week conversation

Have you ever thought I can do better than that? Let’s not mention the mass hysteria when the London 2012 logo was launched! Angus Montgomery, Editor of Design Week, held a talk on ‘People Vs. Graphic Design’, at the Clerkenwell Design Festival with its panel of graphic designers: Patrick Myles (RIBA Journal art editor), Sarah Hyndman (Type Tasting), Jim Sutherland (Founder of Studio Sutherland), Jonathan...

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Helping passengers by understanding their needs

Helping passengers by understanding their needs

Often the best ideas are the simple ones. For anyone catching a bus in London during the rush hour has probably experienced a mad crush on the lower level only to find that the top level is almost empty.  For some, they like the convenience of sitting or standing close to the door.  But for others, there the lack of visibility of what space is...

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Are virtual holographic assistants of value?

Our local station, Kings Cross, now has one of these holographic assistants reminding people not to take heavy luggage up the escalators but to use the lift instead. You will note that just to the right, at the bottom of the escalator, is a sign giving the same message. That sign has been there since the station reopened and, we can assume, has not had...

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Overtaking lanes in public spaces?

Overtaking lanes in public spaces?

We’ve all experienced it in public spaces such as shopping centres, airports, stations etc…you’re in a rush but it’s crowded and you’re stuck behind people wandering along or moving slowly with piles of luggage or shopping. According to a trial at Sheffield Meadowhall shopping centre maybe the answer is segregation or at least trying to remind people they are sharing a space with people who...

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Human Behaviour and Innovation

There was a great feature published on the Design Council website recently about the potential for behavioural design to join up research and practice and to be used to have real impact on a range of social issues. It recognised that many of the issues faced are governed by human behaviour.  Therefore understanding that behaviour better must be key to finding solutions.  In particular linking...

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User led, centered or focused?

All designers talk about the need to understand users as part of the design process…indeed we often talk about “putting users at the heart of everything we do”.  But there is a clear distinction between being led by users (and what they think they want) and understanding what they need and developing new solutions around this. There is a view amongst some in the design...

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Keeping the trust of the user

Keeping the trust of the user

There was an article this week on the BBC Magazine webpage about whether or not pressing the button at pedestrian crossings actually does anything.  Interestingly the answers was “not always”.  It seems there are a number of types of crossing, especially at junctions, where the green man  is just part of the natural cycle of the lights and the timings are not impacted by pressing...

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Smarter Cities Billboards

IBM’s new billboard ads for its Smarter Cities technology have an added value in how they do something useful for the people passing them… Smart advertising (we’re sharing it aren’t we!) but also a though provoking concept – where else could similar ideas be applied? What feels nice about this is its simplicity – it isn’t chucking in some fancy, complex technology.  It’s just somewhere...

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